Review: The Kids Are Alright (online)

Catapult Theatre‘s musical web series, which ran through August and September, is fun, frothy, and full of ideas. Filmed in a variety of styles including via Zoom and utilising songs from both traditional musicals and popular culture, it is always eye-catching and often surprising.

It’s a clever idea, showcasing the versatility of the performers across five parts (and an encore). They are bite sized chunks which can be enjoyed separately or as one full production. Catapult comprises “a new internationally based company of Mountview Grads eager to make art”, and they have done just that.

Available for free on YouTube, this series buzzes with the energy of the young performers on screen. The songs are interesting and not always your usual choices – Rainbow’s I Surrender, anyone – but seem to fit together seamlessly, allowing some characterisations to take shape quickly.

The Kids Are Alright is an accomplished and important piece of work which has some definite high points (I love Candide, so Make Our Garden Grow will lift my heart, especially here as a celebration of craft) and a cast of talented actor-singers. It is funny, perceptive, and inclusive.

Watch out for part five’s rock medley which really gets the party started. Director Carys Wynn and editor Charlie Keable (both perform too) bring out the best in the cast. A nice idea, too, to have an Encore piece (Let The Sunshine In from Hair) to credit everyone fully who contributed throughout. It gives a real sense of community.

Cast: Amy Bianchi, Carmen Law, Carys Wynn, Charlie Bence, Charlie Keable, Cristina Jerney, Daniel Breakwell, David Ballard, Donnaleny Hansen, George Lennan, Hannah Cound, Hannah-Theresa Engen, Holly Gibson, Jan Gunnar Garlid, Josefin Tonnessen, Katy Reynard, Lani Calvert, Ludvig Sundeli, Marcus Jones, Marissa Landy, Marnie Yule, Melisa Camba, Rebecca Harrington, and Ralph Warman.

You can watch all the episodes of The Kids Are Alright on the Catapult Theatre’s YouTube channel.

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