Tag Archives: jeanine tesori

Violet (Charing Cross Theatre)

Following a run of Jeanine Tesori’s musical Caroline or Change, London is now playing host to the UK premiere of an earlier work written with Brian Crawley, Violet, set on a greyhound bus, some of its stops, and in the memory of its main character.

Matthew Harvey and Kaisa Hammarlund. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Matthew Harvey and Kaisa Hammarlund. Photo by Scott Rylander.

The Charing Cross theatre auditorium has been reconfigured in the round, with a stage revolve and ceiling decoration. In this space Violet (and her younger self) join two soldiers and a rag-bag collection of travellers, across the southern states of the USA.

Violet was disfigured as a child and her faith has driven her to seek out healing from a preacher famous on television. She sees herself as ugly and people she meets comment on her scar, but the audience don’t see it (they see her from within rather than through the pitying eyes of others?).

Matthew Harvey and Kaisa Hammarlund. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Janet Mooney and Kaisa Hammarlund. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Tesori’s score may take a few repeated listens to be fully appreciated, but the ensemble pieces on the bus made me think of the airplane camaderie of Come From Away, with different concerns and overlapping stories.

Kaisa Hammarlund impresses as Violet, who trusts no-one and lives on sarcasm, cunning and nervous energy. In her quest for perfection she engages both soldiers, Monty (Matthew Harvey) and Flick (Jay Marsh) in romance, and makes peace both with herself and the Lord by the end of her travels.

Cast of Violet. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Cast of Violet. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Parallel scenes of card playing and musical memories with Young Violet (Madeleine Sellman at the performance I saw) and Keirom Crook as her father, struggling to raise a child who has the eyes and the smile of her dead mother, are effective.

I also enjoyed Janet Mooney’s dual roles as the fussy old lady on the bus and the hooker in the hotel where Violet is not welcome ‘cos she’s white’.

This musical is passionate, topical and heartwarming, and despite some odd staging decisions from director Shuntaro Fujita, it thrives in this intimate theatre and moves swiftly in an economical 95 minute running time.

Kenneth Avery Clark and cast. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Kenneth Avery Clark and cast. Photo by Scott Rylander.

Violet continues at the Charing Cross Theatre until 6 April.

Advertisements

Caroline, or Change (Playhouse Theatre)

poster image for Caroline or Change

The Chichester Theatre production of this accomplished musical has just announced it closes a month early to make room for the transfer of Fiddler on the Roof from the Menier, but I would recommend you take advantage of the deals and discounts now available to see Caroline, or Change, if you can.

Planned for several years, and written by Angels in America author Tony Kushner, this show was originally planned as an opera but instead grew into a stage musical, largely sung-through, composed by Jeanine Tesori (her previous show, Violet, is also in town, and I will report back on that next month).

Dujonna Gift-Simms, Ako Mitchell, Tanisha Spring, Sharon D Clarke
Dujonna Gift-Simms, Ako Mitchell, Tanisha Spring, Sharon D Clarke

Caroline (Sharon D Clarke) is a black maid who works for a rich Jewish family, the Gellmans. She is a widow with three children of her own, who live in poverty under the shadow of the Confederate Statue we see as the play opens, a symbol of the white privilege which stops the likes of Caroline and her friend Dotty (Naana Agyei-Ampadu) from getting on in life.

The opening scene proper gives a sense of the unusual: there is a singing washing-machine, a dryer, and eventually, the lady in the moon. This gives a sense of the fantastic to Caroline’s mundane day of cleaning and doing the laundry.

Me'sha Bryan and Sharon D Clarke
Me’sha Bryan and Sharon D Clarke

We are also introduced to Noah, the spoiled young man of the house (Aaron Gelkoff at this performance), who misses his dead mother, resents his cookie-cut stepmother (Lauren Ward), and enjoys sharing an illicit daily cigarette with Caroline.

Noah has a habit of leaving loose change in his pockets, and this is the “change” which is depicted in the title; he seeks attention by leaving the change for Caroline (who is allowed by Rose, the wife, to keep it), and she takes the opportunity to treat her children to the treats they would otherwise go without.

Sharon D Clarke and Abiona Omonua in Caroline or Change
Sharon D Clarke and Abiona Omonua in Caroline or Change

Politics intrude now and then – the assassination of JFK, who was on the side of civil liberties, and a Chanukah celebration which touches on racial politics, with an argument between Mr Stopnick, Rose’s father (Teddy Kempner) and Emmie, Caroline’s growing daughter (Abiona Omonua) – but what matters is the bond between people, and the aspiration for change in the literal sense.

Noah’s father (Alastair Brookshaw) plays the clarinet and hides his grief; his parents (Vincent Pirillo and Sue Kelvin) add pointed commentary, and Noah grows to find his place in the natural order of things; still, by the ending it seems Caroline has achieved her change, set aside the memories of the sailor she lost, and found her place.

The songs are largely memoraable and vibrant – highlights would include Lot’s Wife, I Hate the Bus, and the Laundry Quintet, with the Radio girls who form a kind of chorus. Clarke is an acting and singing powerhouse, and Omonua is impressive, and all the children do well with their routines.

An informative programme (£5) gives the cultural background on the time depicted, and the genesis of the show.


Silents, Please!

interesting avenues in silent film history

View from the Cheap Seat

News, reviews and opinion from the cheapest seat

Adventure Travel Nepal

Nepal tour operator and trekking agent

FINLAY GRACE ALLAN

PERSONAL STYLE - INTERIOR - LIFE

Gringirls

Two girls one trip

Simply Eleonore

Your typical spleepy bi vegan intersectional feminist

ECBC Manchester

Fighting the Darkness of Mental Illness with Manchester Spirit

%d bloggers like this: